The Digital Lifestyle Show #456 – Microsoft TV?

Welcome to this week’s podcast where we look back at the weeks tech news. We talk about Google I/O and look at Google’s Martial Design, Android Wear and Android TV. Is this Google’s 3rd or 4th attempt at a 10 foot UI? Should Microsoft make their own £99 set top box? Microsoft branding, future versions of Windows and lots more.

I also want to thank Vidabox for their support of the show, Vidabox will be helping us bring together some interesting new videos showing media servers integrated into our digital lifestyle. Vidabox have a great range of media server, media players, iPad mounts and HTPC accessories. I really appreciate their support of the show so please check out

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Listen Here (download mp3) – Watch recording of the show on Youtube

About the author Ian Dixon:
Ian Dixon is a Microsoft MVP (Most Valuable Professional), founder of tech site and producer of the weekly The Digital Lifestyle Show podcast. Ian has been writing and talking about Windows for over 10 years and has over 20 years in IT as an IT Manager. Ian thousands of followers on Twitter and Facebook and over 4 million views on his YouTube channel.
  • DWAnderson
    Why is there not Microsoft TV to compete with $99 boxes from Apple, Roku, Amazon and Google?

    Ii seems to me Microsoft should sell a $99 box that runs a variant of Windows 8.1. If Apple, Roku and Amazon can make such a box, why can’t Microsoft. This device could run media apps for Windows RT and the Xbox One.

    I am probably being overly simplistic, but it seems like For the first time in years Microsoft’s platforms are well aligned to make this happen. Xbox One is running a variant of Windows, so making its apps run on this device should not be too difficult. The Windows RT apps run in a much more constrained environment that is well suited for a device rather than a PC. Now that WIndows is running on ARM, if necessary they could use an ARM processor. Windows now runs leaner than ever, reducing the hardware resources (and cost) needed for such a box. The acquisition of Nokia gives Microsoft access to personnel skilled in hardware manufacturing and sales.

    This may not be a billion dollar business, but it preserves Microsoft’s ability to keep its platforms and services wherever people might want them and that should be important to them, especially if their services are not welcome on boxes running of other platforms, e.g. Android TV, Fire TV or Apple TV.

    Reprinted at

    • Ian Dixon
      Very good points, will talk about it on the show next week
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